Yoga Practice for Ease and Strength Helping to facilitate healing changes, through strengthening the body and the mind, while augmenting flexibility and responsiveness.
Joseph B. Clifford, D.C.
Say "NO!" to the development and  production genetically modified foods! Help support the growth of healthy, organic food production.
Protect our Constitution!

 Richly Rewarding Energy Flow through Physical Participation

For many years, I have not only promoted attaining nervous system ease for improving one's health and quality of life, I have also recognized and suggested the importance of other life changes, such as dietary modifications, cleanses, and regular exercise (at least 3-4 times per week).  All too frequently, people's symptoms/complaints are created by drastic imbalances relative to one or more of the above.  Human beings are not designed or created to be exposed to the many toxins we encounter on a daily basis. The typical American diet is atrocious and is guaranteed to lead down a path to self-destruction. Most Americans' lifestyles, including their jobs and life-choices, predispose them to minimal or no exercise. Each of these stressors frequently extends beyond the limits of our genetic makeup.  I have learned to acknowledge that not everyone is going to respond as I would desire to our Chiropractic care. Over the 36 years in my practice (including the first 10, which were more of bone, joint, muscle, symptom orientation), I have discovered two factors that play important roles in whether or not a patient or practice member achieves outcomes that would be most advantageous for improving her quality of life.  In my earlier years studying with Dr. Donald Epstein (founder and developer of Network Chiropractic/ Spinal Analysis), the concept of intention was introduced to us as an important factor in our capabilities as performing as Network facilitators.  "Being present" was also extremely necessary in order to properly provide care to our practice members. In other words, why was I there in the room with these people, and even though I was physically present was I consciously present?  These two factors, Intention and Being Present, are also necessary when people are seeking and participating in any form of life-change, including health care.  What are their intentions when seeking and entering care, and what expectations do they have regarding their own roles while receiving it? Any practice of Yoga goes far beyond the mechanical physical performance of the postures or asanas. Yoga is a form of meditation that requires some recognition of why individuals choose to start a practice, and it functions best when individuals are  consciously present in what they are doing within the time and space of  their session.  In other words, if one does not feel what is being created in the body, is anything happening at all? The Foundation of all exercise is called "movement"! ~~Bryan Kest Most or all real health comes from a peaceful Mind. This Mind includes both the conscious thinking mind and the subconscious vegetative mind. All too frequently (usually after receiving an adjustment) individuals mention to us their appointment times are their only times of peace and quiet.  What a shame.... In most cases, it is by conscious choice of people to initiate care or to terminate their care. It is by conscious choice whether or not folks start exercise and/or dietary commitments. It is by conscious choice that they maintain helter-skelter life-styles and attempt to fulfill the demands of the same.  Yoga practice, as a meditative form, not only helps the practitioner to learn to focus her conscious thoughts down to a minimum and into a zone of quiet (reducing the average of 65,000 scattered thoughts per day!), a practice also facilitates physical awareness, both within the subconscious brain and within the conscious thoughts. The quality of ones practice is determined by the quality of ones attention given throughout the flow of postures and its connected breaths.   Mahatma Gandhi put it this way: Your thoughts become your words,  your words become your actions,  your actions become your habits,  your habits become your values,  your values become your Destiny.   Each of us in our lives experiences ebbs and flows within almost every aspect of our existence. Moderate exercise in every form is shown to improve one's mental and physical healths. A sedentary lifestyle lends itself to physiological stagnation, which then leads to a slow demise.  Initiating a Yoga practice is an excellent idea at all levels of mental/emotional, physiological, and physical beings.  A Yoga practice, as mentioned, helps to quiet one's mind (the place where healing takes place). It improves physiological functions included within the heart and lungs, the bony structures of the spine and extremities, and within muscles and connective tissues of joints. Healing effects are shared with the lymphatic, digestive, endocrine/glandular, and eliminative systems, as well. Recently, research is showing that Yoga practice effects us not only to our tissue and cellular level, but all the way to our DNA!  From my perspective as a chiropractor, regardless of age, increasing one's body/core muscular strengths is very important, along with improving the suppleness of the muscles of the body and the joints to which they are attached.  Yoga postures, when practiced regularly, have been shown to improved both spinal and extremity alignments and improved ranges of motion. Refining one's nervous system function (through B.G.I. care and meditation practices) and improving body-movement capabilities is like fine-tuning the electrical system of an automobile, while assuring that the chassis is well greased and oiled. Regardless of age, starting an exercise routine and particularly a Yoga practice is an all-win and no-lose proposition!   I have put together a basic practice (see below) that can be performed in its totality or in increments. My intention is not to provide a continually flowing Hatha Yoga practice, but rather to offer exercises or asanas that can be used to generate some body heat, to provide enough resistance to create an environment for stretching out muscles and joints, and with practice to build muscle size and density.  All of these perks will aid in one's overall health and vitality. Each of these positions also has an effect on the internal organs--either by reversing the usual forces of gravity or by twisting the soft tissues they receive an internal massage.  I am deeply grateful to  Yoga Journal (www.yogajournal.com) and its Practice Sequence Generator for the images that I have provided to you.  After many years of chronic overuse wear and tear from running and cycling, I have chosen to seek a more peaceful alternative to these sports. For over 11 years, I have attempted to maintain a 4-5-day per week Yoga schedule. As with most exercise routines, 3-4 times per week is excellent. Consistency/ commitment is very important for developing the most efficient change and growth potentials.  I would like to share a few of the DVD and audio programs that I have enjoyed:   Bryan Kest (Power Yoga DVD, with 3 levels--less than an hour each-- and a number of audio recordings of his classes--from 1 1/2 to 2 hours each). Bryan beautifully describes (in his own way ;>) each pose and its subtleties. These workouts require moderate conditioning that comes with patience and practice. Poses may be held at some lengths, while providing excellent stretching opportunities. His advanced routines are more of a challenge, however they can be "mastered" in time. I have learned a wonderful concept called Acceptance -- for I have accepted that there are some poses that I may NEVER fully accomplish; what a chance for Growth ;>) Bryan also has produced audio recordings of his actual classes. Each is 1 1/2 -2 hours in length and require moderate practice and strength development.   Shiva Rae's Yoga Shakti and other productions are excellent for  warming Hatha Yoga practices. She does not describe  poses as thoroughly as does Bryan Kest, however once you learn her various practices, the flow is superb (guided by the flows of breath).  A Yoga Matrix is provided with these DVDs, which allows the user to choose any of her posture routines and create your own workout. Shiva’s Yoga Shakti also provides two ready-made Sun Salutations routines (hotter and more aerobic) and a Lunar routine (more casual and relaxing). A number of her postures requires either special genetic makeup, years of practice of gymnastics and/or Yoga, or a mixture of each.  Tony Sanchez's Yoga Challenge DVD is a wonderful 1-hour class that emphasizes balance and stretching routines. At this point in my Yoga experience, I use this class as a rest day.  Tony Horton's (Power 90X Yoga DVD.) Tony is a physical trainer and not a Yoga instructor. His 1 1/2 class routine is excellently described and includes just about any posture that a beginner would desire. His workout, however, is for the beginner that seeks a more aggressive workout from the beginning. With time and practice, the body will adapt, get stronger, and become more aerobically fit. Tony appears to be more dogmatic than I would desire for a yoga practice. Kimberly Fowler has a DVD, Yoga for Athletes, that is an excellent  Yoga video (~1 hour long) for a beginning practitioner. She offers a well-rounded routine and describes the poses excellently. My wishes would be for the postural stretches to be held longer.  Some experience with yoga postures and their names (either in English or Sanskrit) would be beneficial prior to starting the above routines--however, not necessary. Being aware of the asanas' names helps one to start forming  the postures without first being talked through them to completion. Susan Winter Ward is a favorite of Network Transformational Gates. Her presentations are more gentle, well described, and excellent for the yogi who desires more gentle workout routines. Her movements are  for any age and level of flexibility.  If you are new to Yoga, and you are in your search for a video or audio program, find an instructor that thoroughly describes the basic poses. A visual presentation is helpful, so that you can visualize the postures along with hearing a verbal description of each move. After you memorize the routine, you may be able to turn off the video and be lead by the simplicity of the audio. I would suggest that your first workout sessions be no longer than 50 minutes to an hour (20-30 minutes is also an excellent introduction of your body and mind to the new stimuli of Yoga practice).  Older folks, who have spent years of their lives sedentary, have possibly lost much of their stamina, strengths, and flexibility. My suggestion is to seek a program, such as that produced by Susan Ward, that is gentle and possibly designed for "seniors". (It is known that choosing a lifestyle that routinely includes exercise and particularly a Yoga practice maintains and protects the youthful physiology of each participant.)  As your strength and stamina grow, you will find greater ease in progressing into a longer and more strenuous routine. Firstly, stay simple and eliminate the ego. If you push hard from the beginning, you may become injured, burn out, and lose interest. Please Note: There is no perfect looking posture for you; the  pictures are only guidelines. At the point that you are able to perform comfortably is your level of Yoga "perfection". Maintaining long even breaths is most important. If you find yourself not breathing or taking short choppy breaths, it is best to back off a touch or stop altogether.  As I mentioned, I used the facilities of Yoga Journal to choose for the members of my practice a sequence of postures that I believe will help in developing flexibility and strength. A choice to physically participate in these exercises will then assist in mechanical and neurological shifts touched by B.G.I. care.  You may pick up a copy of this Yoga workout (in PDF format), here. Namasté  
What is Yoga?    *Yoga is the path toward the union of our bounded self with our ultimate Nature. *It is not a practice, but a certain way to be. *Yoga deepens, broadens, and strengthens the visionary power of the Mind.  *It opens the door of that realm of sensing beyond the five senses.
"In doing a pose, doing it right or wrong doesn't depend upon if you're falling,   it depends if your smiling."  ~~Bryan Kest
"You can't take care of something that you don't touch. All these places you are feeling are dying for a little affection. There must be a little sweetness just knowing every nook and cranny is getting immersed in oxygen-rich blood, flushing out toxicity, flushing in nourishment, increasing awareness of the most important place on Earth to be aware of-- myself."  ~~ Bryan Kest
BioGeometric Integration's Tetrahedrons
Yoga Practice for Ease and Strength Helping to facilitate healing changes, through strengthening the body and the mind, while augmenting flexibility and responsiveness.
                        Joseph B. Clifford, D.C.
Say "NO!" to the development and  production genetically modified foods!
Protect our Constitution!

 Richly Rewarding Energy Flow through Physical

Participation

For many years, I have not only promoted attaining nervous system ease for improving one's health and quality of life, I have also recognized and suggested the importance of other life changes, such as dietary modifications, cleanses, and regular exercise (at least 3-4 times per week).  All too frequently, people's symptoms/complaints are created by drastic imbalances relative to one or more of the above.  Human beings are not designed or created to be exposed to the many toxins we encounter on a daily basis. The typical American diet is atrocious and is guaranteed to lead down a path to self- destruction. Most Americans' lifestyles, including their jobs and life-choices, predispose them to minimal or no exercise. Each of these stressors frequently extends beyond the limits of our genetic makeup.  I have learned to acknowledge that not everyone is going to respond as I would desire to our Chiropractic care. Over the 36 years in my practice (including the first 10, which were more of bone, joint, muscle, symptom orientation), I have discovered two factors that play important roles in whether or not a patient or practice member achieves outcomes that would be most advantageous for improving her quality of life.  In my earlier years studying with Dr. Donald Epstein (founder and developer of Network Chiropractic/ Spinal Analysis), the concept of intention was introduced to us as an important factor in our capabilities as performing as Network facilitators.  "Being present" was also extremely necessary in order to properly provide care to our practice members. In other words, why was I there in the room with these people, and even though I was physically present was I consciously present?  These two factors, Intention and Being Present, are also necessary when people are seeking and participating in any form of life-change, including health care.  What are their intentions when seeking and entering care, and what expectations do they have regarding their own roles while receiving it? Any practice of Yoga goes far beyond the mechanical physical performance of the postures or asanas. Yoga is a form of meditation that requires some recognition of why individuals choose to start a practice, and it functions best when individuals are  consciously present in what they are doing within the time and space of  their session.  In other words, if one does not feel what is being created in the body, is anything happening at all? The Foundation of all exercise is called "movement"! ~~Bryan Kest Most or all real health comes from a peaceful Mind. This Mind includes both the conscious thinking mind and the subconscious vegetative mind. All too frequently (usually after receiving an adjustment) individuals mention to us their appointment times are their only times of peace and quiet.  What a shame.... In most cases, it is by conscious choice of people to initiate care or to terminate their care. It is by conscious choice whether or not folks start exercise and/or dietary commitments. It is by conscious choice that they maintain helter-skelter life-styles and attempt to fulfill the demands of the same.  Yoga practice, as a meditative form, not only helps the practitioner to learn to focus her conscious thoughts down to a minimum and into a zone of quiet (reducing the average of 65,000 scattered thoughts per day!), a practice also facilitates physical awareness, both within the subconscious brain and within the conscious thoughts. The quality of ones practice is determined by the quality of ones attention given throughout the flow of postures and its connected breaths.   Mahatma Gandhi put it this way: Your thoughts become your words,  your words become your actions,  your actions become your habits,  your habits become your values,  your values become your Destiny.   Each of us in our lives experiences ebbs and flows within almost every aspect of our existence. Moderate exercise in every form is shown to improve one's mental and physical healths. A sedentary lifestyle lends itself to physiological stagnation, which then leads to a slow demise.  Initiating a Yoga practice is an excellent idea at all levels of mental/emotional, physiological, and physical beings.  A Yoga practice, as mentioned, helps to quiet one's mind (the place where healing takes place). It improves physiological functions included within the heart and lungs, the bony structures of the spine and extremities, and within muscles and connective tissues of joints. Healing effects are shared with the lymphatic, digestive, endocrine/glandular, and eliminative systems, as well. Recently, research is showing that Yoga practice effects us not only to our tissue and cellular level, but all the way to our DNA!  From my perspective as a chiropractor, regardless of age, increasing one's body/core muscular strengths is very important, along with improving the suppleness of the muscles of the body and the joints to which they are attached.  Yoga postures, when practiced regularly, have been shown to improved both spinal and extremity alignments and improved ranges of motion. Refining one's nervous system function (through B.G.I. care and meditation practices) and improving body-movement capabilities is like fine-tuning the electrical system of an automobile, while assuring that the chassis is well greased and oiled. Regardless of age, starting an exercise routine and particularly a Yoga practice is an all-win and no-lose proposition!   I have put together a basic practice (see below) that can be performed in its totality or in increments. My intention is not to provide a continually flowing Hatha Yoga practice, but rather to offer exercises or asanas that can be used to generate some body heat, to provide enough resistance to create an environment for stretching out muscles and joints, and with practice to build muscle size and density.  All of these perks will aid in one's overall health and vitality. Each of these positions also has an effect on the internal organs--either by reversing the usual forces of gravity or by twisting the soft tissues they receive an internal massage.  I am deeply grateful to  Yoga Journal (www.yogajournal.com) and its Practice Sequence Generator for the images that I have provided to you.  After many years of chronic overuse wear and tear from running and cycling, I have chosen to seek a more peaceful alternative to these sports. For over 11 years, I have attempted to maintain a 4-5-day per week Yoga schedule. As with most exercise routines, 3-4 times per week is excellent. Consistency/ commitment is very important for developing the most efficient change and growth potentials.  I would like to share a few of the DVD and audio programs that I have enjoyed:   Bryan Kest (Power Yoga DVD, with 3 levels--less than an hour each-- and a number of audio recordings of his classes-- from 1 1/2 to 2 hours each). Bryan beautifully describes (in his own way ;>) each pose and its subtleties. These workouts require moderate conditioning that comes with patience and practice. Poses may be held at some lengths, while providing excellent stretching opportunities. His advanced routines are more of a challenge, however they can be "mastered" in time. I have learned a wonderful concept called Acceptance -- for I have accepted that there are some poses that I may NEVER fully accomplish; what a chance for Growth ;>) Bryan also has produced audio recordings of his actual classes. Each is 1 1/2 -2 hours in length and require moderate practice and strength development.   Shiva Rae's Yoga Shakti and other productions are excellent for  warming Hatha Yoga practices. She does not describe  poses as thoroughly as does Bryan Kest, however once you learn her various practices, the flow is superb (guided by the flows of breath).  A Yoga Matrix is provided with these DVDs, which allows the user to choose any of her posture routines and create your own workout. Shiva’s Yoga Shakti also provides two ready- made Sun Salutations routines (hotter and more aerobic) and a Lunar routine (more casual and relaxing). A number of her postures requires either special genetic makeup, years of practice of gymnastics and/or Yoga, or a mixture of each.  Tony Sanchez's Yoga Challenge DVD is a wonderful 1-hour class that emphasizes balance and stretching routines. At this point in my Yoga experience, I use this class as a rest day.  Tony Horton's (Power 90X Yoga DVD.) Tony is a physical trainer and not a Yoga instructor. His 1 1/2 class routine is excellently described and includes just about any posture that a beginner would desire. His workout, however, is for the beginner that seeks a more aggressive workout from the beginning. With time and practice, the body will adapt, get stronger, and become more aerobically fit. Tony appears to be more dogmatic than I would desire for a yoga practice. Kimberly Fowler has a DVD, Yoga for Athletes, that is an excellent  Yoga video (~1 hour long) for a beginning practitioner. She offers a well-rounded routine and describes the poses excellently. My wishes would be for the postural stretches to be held longer.  Some experience with yoga postures and their names (either in English or Sanskrit) would be beneficial prior to starting the above routines--however, not necessary. Being aware of the asanas' names helps one to start forming  the postures without first being talked through them to completion. Susan Winter Ward is a favorite of Network Transformational Gates. Her presentations are more gentle, well described, and excellent for the yogi who desires more gentle workout routines. Her movements are  for any age and level of flexibility.  If you are new to Yoga, and you are in your search for a video or audio program, find an instructor that thoroughly describes the basic poses. A visual presentation is helpful, so that you can visualize the postures along with hearing a verbal description of each move. After you memorize the routine, you may be able to turn off the video and be lead by the simplicity of the audio. I would suggest that your first workout sessions be no longer than 50 minutes to an hour (20-30 minutes is also an excellent introduction of your body and mind to the new stimuli of Yoga practice).  Older folks, who have spent years of their lives sedentary, have possibly lost much of their stamina, strengths, and flexibility. My suggestion is to seek a program, such as that produced by Susan Ward, that is gentle and possibly designed for "seniors". (It is known that choosing a lifestyle that routinely includes exercise and particularly a Yoga practice maintains and protects the youthful physiology of each participant.)  As your strength and stamina grow, you will find greater ease in progressing into a longer and more strenuous routine. Firstly, stay simple and eliminate the ego. If you push hard from the beginning, you may become injured, burn out, and lose interest. Please Note: There is no perfect looking posture for you; the  pictures are only guidelines. At the point that you are able to perform comfortably is your level of Yoga "perfection". Maintaining long even breaths is most important. If you find yourself not breathing or taking short choppy breaths, it is best to back off a touch or stop altogether.  As I mentioned, I used the facilities of Yoga Journal to choose for the members of my practice a sequence of postures that I believe will help in developing flexibility and strength. A choice to physically participate in these exercises will then assist in mechanical and neurological shifts touched by B.G.I. care.  You may pick up a copy of this Yoga workout (in PDF format), here. Namasté  
What is Yoga?    *Yoga is the path toward the union of our bounded self with our ultimate Nature. *It is not a practice, but a certain way to be. *Yoga deepens, broadens, and strengthens the visionary power of the Mind.  *It opens the door of that realm of sensing beyond the five senses.
"In doing a pose, doing it right or wrong doesn't depend upon if you're falling,   it depends if your smiling."  ~~Bryan Kest "You can't take care of something that you don't touch. All these places you are feeling are dying for a little affection. There must be a little sweetness just knowing every nook and cranny is getting immersed in oxygen-rich blood, flushing out toxicity, flushing in nourishment, increasing awareness of the most important place on Earth to be aware of--myself."  ~~ Bryan Kest